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Canadian Immigration Blog


Counting Our Own Ballots: 2015 Federal Election & Immigration Survey Results!

October 16, 2015
Canada-flag-150x150 Mario Bellissimo

With the Federal election not far behind us and a very high turnout for advance voting, this political race was filled with intrigue down to the final ballot count.  Immigration and refugee issues have become front-and-centre in this election to an arguably unprecedented level.  Please check out the survey results below.  Certain issues clearly divide Canadians.  Thank you for the many followers that participated.

Survey Start Date: September 02, 2015

Survey End Date: October 06, 2015

Question 1

The Government of Canada recently raised the residency requirements for citizenship for permanent resident applicants from requiring three years of physical presence in the country over the last four years, to four years of presence in the last six. Do you agree with this change in the Citizenship Act?
Question 1

Summary: Answers to this question seem to be closely split between “Strongly Agree” and “Strongly Disagree”. While 30% of respondents strongly disagree with the change in the Citizenship Act, 28% of them strongly agree. Far less agree, are neutral or disagree, with 12%, 14%, and 16%, respectively.

Question 2

Do you agree that a child born in Canada regardless of immigration status should be entitled to Canadian Citizenship?
Question 2

Summary: The vast majority of respondents “Strongly Agree” that a child born in Canada regardless of immigration status should be entitled to Canadian Citizenship. This answer comprises 46% of responses. None of the respondents remained neutral on the matter, with the rest either agreeing (20%), disagreeing (20%) and strongly disagreeing(14%). Overall, most individuals tend to be in favour with a total of 66% answering in agreement (eg. strongly agree and agree combined).

Question 3

Should Canada be increasing the number of immigrants admitted each year?

Question 3

Summary: Out of the total respondents, the majority strongly agree that Canada should be increasing the number of immigrants admitted each year –this amounts to 38%.  The others are split evenly between disagree and strongly disagree (at 14%), while the rest are 22% agree and 12% neutral.

 Question 4

A recent Federal Court decision found that changes made to refugee healthcare in 2012 were unconstitutional. As a result, the decision led to restored healthcare to refugee claimants. Do you think that refugee claimants should be entitled to health care coverage while they wait for their claim to be processed?
Question 4

Summary:  32% of respondents strongly agree that refugee claimants should be entitled to health care coverage as they wait for their claim to be processed. In comparison, 18% strongly disagree. This is a difference of 14%. 22% of the rest agree, while 16% are neutral and 12% disagree.

Question 5

Should family reunification form a larger part of Canada’s immigration program?

Question 5

Summary: Nearly half of respondents strongly agree that family reunification should form a larger part of Canada’s immigration program. 48% comprise this category. Far less strongly disagree, with only 10%. 24% agree while 12% are neutral and 6% disagree. In sum, a total of 72% are in agreement to increase family reunification (agree and strongly agree). This is in strong contrast with a total of 16% who disagree (disagree and strongly disagree).

(Source)

 

 


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