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Specialists in Immigration Litigation & Inadmissability
20 Eglinton Ave. West, Toronto ON
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Federal Court Procedure

Has your case been refused?

We represent clients at each stage of the litigation (sometimes referred to as the “appeal”) process, including at the Federal Court of Appeal, Federal Court, the Immigration Appeal Division, the Immigration Division, the Refugee Protection Division and the Refugee Appeal Division.

At Bellissimo Law Group, we pride ourselves on being one of the leading law firms that deal with refusals, including family class, deportations, residency cases, citizenship and refugee matters. In this section, we set out some basic considerations at the Federal Court.

Federal Court Procedure:

5 Immediate Steps for Legal Representatives

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5 Immediate Steps for Legal Representatives

1) THE REFUSAL – Take a breath and read the refusal letter closely. Then put it down and read it again in an hour or two. Ensure it relates to you, client ID numbers cross reference, and that names and dates make sense. Look to see if you can find any errors of fact.

2) TIMELINE/LIMITATION PERIOD –Quickly identify the nature of the refusal, in land, overseas, citizenship, a misrepresentation? Different appeal periods apply – 15, 30 or 60 days. This is critical to understanding the timeline under which you are operating.

3) MY ERROR – Look closely and determine if you committed an error in preparing and submitting the application.

4) ADVISE CLIENT – If you are a representative, advise the client of the refusal and the areas of concern. Further advise if is this is a case wherein you will be handling the appeal or sending it out to a specialist. Timelines, potential errors and costs can be canvassed in a preliminary manner.

5) CALL THE LITIGATOR – If referring the call, act as a liaison between the litigator and your client. Understand appeal timelines, costs and immediate steps required. Ensure you have a proper record to hand off to the litigator. Ensure the litigator is well-versed in these types of appeals and has a clear plan of action. Often-times, litigators will charge a fee for this initial assessment.

Key Preparatory Steps for Lawyers, Consultants and Clients

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Key Preparatory Steps for Lawyers, Consultants and Clients
  1. TABLE OF CONTENTS –When preparing submissions include a detailed Table of Contents of the enclosures numbering the corresponding pages (either in your submission letter or separately including supporting documents) identifying the same pages in your Table of Contents. A litigator and the courts appreciate a well prepared and organized application package. It also ensures when CIC or CBSA vets the file you are in a position to cross check with your own records.
  2. PROVIDE THE FULL FILE – Always provide the litigator with a copy of the entire file, including all opposing disclosure, i.e.: failed refugee claims as the Board is oftentimes using updated disclosure packages, POE notes, which are often helpful in extracting points of contention.
  3. ATIP REQUESTS – Make it a habit to order a fewATIP requests as these are especially helpful in litigation. With files taking years to process this information will be updated so one request may not be sufficient. These allow the applicant an opportunity to know the case to be met before having to wait to review the Respondent’s Memorandum. It takes a great deal of time to receive the ATIP packages and almost always too long to await in preparing an Application Record for Federal Court or Refugee Appeal Division. Sometimes it is best to just order the GCMS in emergency circumstances as these can be produced much faster that the entire file.
  4. DOCKETING FILE – Always follow up any conversations with the Embassy, CIC Office or the Board with letters confirming conversations as it has often been the case where officers indicate they did not receive calls, etc or make the alleged statement. These will make it in to the file and be available in the ATIP request as well.
  5. INTERVIEWS – Always request in person interviews if an officer is making credibility assessments.
  6. CASE LAW – Look to case law for ‘language’ utilized by the Courts.
  7. REASONS – Always request full written reasons of the decision maker within your submission.
  8. MANAGE EXPECTATIONS –Although not anticipated or desirable, you must have the conversation with your client regarding a potential refusal before a refusal. It at least provides a frame of reference for the client in the case of a negative decision.
  9. RECONSIDERATION REQUESTS – Although requests for reconsiderations are often ignored or not considered on refusals, they are not ALWAYS ignored and can save your client the cost of litigation -although unlikely, still worth the letter.
  10. KEEP CURRENT – Know the latest case law in the area you are dealing with to ensure you have the latest interpretation of the law as it affects your client.
Notice of Application

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Notice of Application

The filing of a Notice commences judicial review proceedings (the Application for Leave). The Notice of Application must be served on the Respondent (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration as one example) and then re-filed with the Court Registry after service. The Notice of Application must be filed within 15 or 60 days of the “decision” being communicated to the  applicant. The following information is required to complete the Notice of Application:

  1. The name of the Applicant;
  2. The name of the tribunal that made the decision. Some offices are reluctant to give out the name of the decision-maker and the signature on the refusal letter is often illegible;
  3. The location of the tribunal.  Exact addresses are not necessary and the address can be described as “the Canadian Embassy in China” or the “Canadian High Commission in New Delhi” for example;
  4. The date that the decision is made. This will usually be the date that the refusal letter is signed;
  5. The date that the decision was communicated to the applicant. The Federal Court Act provides that where a decision is sent by ordinary mail, it is deemed to have been received on the 10th day after it was mailed. It is important to advise clients to keep the envelopes in which the decision arrives because there can be a delay between the date that the letter of refusal was signed and the date that it was mailed;
  6. The applicant’s visa office file number;
  7. The Notice of Application must also set out the grounds upon which the Applicant is seeking to have the decision set aside.
Appearance

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Appearance

After a Notice of Application is filed and served upon the Respondent, the Respondent Minister has 10 days in which to serve and file an Appearance. There is no special significance to this document other than the fact that if it is not served and filed on time, the Respondent has lost its right to participate in the proceedings or to be notified of further stages of the process.

Affidavits

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Affidavits

When a Notice of Application has been filed, the Applicant has 30 days in which to serve and file an affidavit (or affidavits) in support of the application. The Respondent then has 30 days in which to serve and file their affidavit evidence. The Respondent’s affidavit materials usually consist of an affidavit from the officer or someone in the office that has knowledge of the file.

The Applicant’s affidavit must be based on actual knowledge of the Applicant. Although affidavits that are used in ancillary proceedings (such as applications for extensions of time) can be based upon belief, this is not true in affidavits in support of original actions. If an affidavit is based upon hearsay or belief (as opposed to knowledge), the Respondent can, and often does, bring a motion to have the affidavit struck out.

Certain applications for leave for judicial review are based upon what occurred or did not occur during an interview with an officer. It is extremely important that clients, who are unaccompanied at the interview, make detailed notes as soon as possible after the interview concludes so that they will be able to furnish as much detail as possible about the interview. A lack of detail in what exactly transpired will be fatal when compared to the affidavit of an officer who has the assistance of detailed notes made at the time of the interview,

The affidavit must give details as to the basis of the attack on the decision. If it does not, the Respondent can bring a motion to have the proceedings struck out as not disclosing a cause of action. The more detailed the evidence, the more chance the application will have of success.

Although the affidavit must be based upon actual knowledge there is nothing wrong with statements such as “I believe that I was dealt with unfairly.” Although technically incorrect, it helps define what the issues are in the application for judicial review.

Relevant documents can and should be attached to the affidavit as exhibits. More than one affidavit can be filed. If someone other than the applicant has relevant information concerning the matter (such as a previous representative or a family member) then additional affidavits should be filed.

Application Record

Within 30 days (can be as much as 40) of receiving the Reasons the applicant must perfect and file an application record. An application record consists of the following:

  1. a table of contents;
  2. a copy of the Notice of Application;
  3. copies of the affidavit or affidavits;
  4. a copy of the decision of the visa officer;
  5. copies of the contents of the file of the visa officer which include all documentation that was before the visa officer when the decision was made;
  6. a memorandum of legal points to be argued and a list of legal cases or authorities that are being relied upon.

After the application record has been served and filed with the Court, the Respondent has 30 days in which to file their application record. Ten days after the latter filing, the Applicant may file a Memorandum of Reply.

Remaining Procedure

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Remaining Procedure

If leave is granted, the Court produces the Certified Tribunal Record and the Applicant and Respondent have the option of filing a Further Affidavit and Further Memorandum. The Court also sets the matter down within 90 days of granting leave. These documents are critical as the legal tests for obtaining leave and successfully overturning a decision at the judicial are different. Both the Applicant and Respondent are also given a time period in which to cross-examine the deponent of the affidavit. Such cross-examinations are helpful but not always done as the cost can be prohibitive. After the Respondent’s affidavits are filed, the Applicant has 20 days in which to complete any cross-examinations. The entire court proceeding usually takes between 6 months to a year to conclude.

Work Involved

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Work Involved
  • Review of the immigration file, the law, including all relevant legislation and case law;
  • Application to the Privacy Commission; application to Ottawa for the GCMS notes;
  • To collect all relevant materials related to the client’s immigration history and assess chances of a successful application at the Federal Court;
  • Preparation of case strategy;
  • To pursue all other reasonable and appropriate appeal remedies and all work incidental thereto including the filing a notice of application, supporting affidavits, to cross-examine the visa officer overseas by telephone, collection of case law and evidence to support the case; to compose legal and factual argument; to prepare books of argument, evidence and case law.
  • Other unexpected circumstances are motions. For example, if the visa officer on cross examination promises a copy of a document but then does not produce a copy or is taking too long the Applicant would bring a motion at the Federal Court to seek an order to have the officer produce the document.
Cross Examination

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Cross Examination

Rule 12(2) of the Federal Courts Immigration and Refugee Protection Rules, SOR/2002-232 (FCIRPR), provides that cross-examination on affidavits filed in connection with an application for leave and for judicial review may be conducted only after leave to proceed with the application for judicial review is granted, absent special reasons.

Where leave is granted, the Federal Court Order will include the time limits within which cross-examinations, if any, on affidavits are to be completed. The option to cross examine an officer on his or her affidavit is exercised quite infrequently by immigration counsel. However, in the appropriate circumstances, an effective cross examination can be the decisive factor in succeeding on a judicial review application.

In the immigration context, we are often cross-examining persons over the telephone. Cross-examination on affidavit is best reserved for cases in which the affiant attests to information which is not supported by any documentary evidence. This may be the case where the affiant attests to having taken certain steps towards processing an application for which no evidence exists, or where the affiant attests to having personal knowledge of a particular aspect of processing based on his or her own experience. Where a client’s budget is limited a cross examination in writing, although not as effective, is a viable option and better than no cross examination at all on certain files.